Cover Caption


Abstract

Cover: A blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) raises its fluke before making a deep dive on its winter feeding grounds, Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico. Although blue whales are the largest animals on Earth, they are rare, and their abundance is difficult to estimate. On pages 526-535, Williams et al. demonstrate an application of spatial modeling to estimate abundance of blue whales off the coast of Chile. Their comparison of these estimates of abundance with those for Antarctic blue whales allowed them to infer that Chilean and Antarctic blue whales are separate populations. Additionally, the methods allowed assessment of current abundance of Chilean blue whales relative to abundance before intensive hunting in the 1900s.

Photographer: Tui De Roy (http://www.tuideroy.com) is a founding fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers. Her work has been published in over 30 countries. She has published 7 large-format books on the Galápagos Islands and other books on the Andes, Antarctica, New Zealand, and the world's albatrosses. Tui founded Th e Roving Tortoise Nature Photography (http://www.rovingtortoise.co.nz) in partnership with Mark Jones. She has spent most of her life in the Galápagos Islands, is a former member of the board of directors of the Charles Darwin Foundation, and works in close association with Galápagos National Park to document the islands and their rare species. Tui currently lives in New Zealand.

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