Get access

Evaluating Perceived Benefits of Ecoregional Assessments

Authors

  • MADELEINE C. BOTTRILL,

    Corresponding author
    1. The University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia
    2. The Nature Conservancy, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MORENA MILLS,

    1. Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australia
    2. Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ROBERT L. PRESSEY,

    1. Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • EDWARD T. GAME,

    1. Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • CRAIG GROVES

    1. The Nature Conservancy, 40 E. Main St. Suite 200, Bozeman, MT 59715, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

Current address: Conservation International, 2011 Crystal Drive, Suite 500, Arlington, VA 22202, U.S.A., email m.bottrill@conservation.org

Abstract

Abstract:  The outcomes of systematic conservation planning (process of assessing, implementing, and managing conservation areas) are rarely reported or measured formally. A lack of consistent or rigorous evaluation in conservation planning has fueled debate about the extent to which conservation assessment (identification, design, and prioritization of potential conservation areas) ultimately influences actions on the ground. We interviewed staff members of a nongovernmental organization, who were involved in 5 ecoregional assessments across North and South America and the Asia-Pacific region. We conducted 17 semistructured interviews with open and closed questions about the perceived purpose, outputs, and outcomes of the ecoregional assessments in which respondents were involved. Using qualitative data collected from those interviews, we investigated the types and frequency of benefits perceived to have emerged from the ecoregional assessments and explored factors that might facilitate or constrain the flow of benefits. Some benefits reflected the intended purpose of ecoregional assessments. Other benefits included improvements in social interactions, attitudes, and institutional knowledge. Our results suggest the latter types of benefits enable ultimate benefits of assessments, such as guiding investments by institutional partners. Our results also showed a clear divergence between the respondents’ expectations and perceived outcomes of implementation of conservation actions arising from ecoregional assessments. Our findings suggest the need for both a broader perspective on the contribution of assessments to planning goals and further evaluation of conservation assessments.

Abstract

Resumen:  Los resultados de la planificación sistemática de la conservación (proceso de evaluación, implementación y manejo de áreas de conservación) raramente son registradas o medidas formalmente. La falta de evaluación consistente o rigurosa de la planificación de la conservación ha alimentado el debate sobre la extensión en la que la evaluación de la conservación (identificación, diseño y priorización de las potenciales áreas de conservación) influye en acciones reales. Entrevistamos a miembros del personal de una organización no gubernamental involucrados en 5 evaluaciones ecorregionales en América del Norte y del Sur y en la región Asia-Pacífico. Aplicamos 17 cuestionarios semiestructurados con preguntas abiertas y cerradas sobre las percepciones respecto al objetivo, insumos y resultados de la evaluaciones ecorregionales en que estaban involucrados los encuestados. Utilizando los datos cualitativos recolectados en las entrevistas, investigamos los tipos y frecuencia de beneficios percibidos que emergieron de las evaluaciones ecorregionales y exploramos los factores que pueden facilitar o limitar el flujo de beneficios. Algunos beneficios reflejaron el propósito deseado de las evaluaciones ecorregionales. Otros beneficios incluyeron mejoras en las interacciones, actitudes y conocimiento institucional de la sociedad. Nuestros resultados sugieren que este tipo de beneficios posibilita los beneficios finales de las evaluaciones, como la orientación de inversiones de los socios institucionales. Nuestros resultados también mostraron una clara divergencia entre las expectativas de los encuestados y los resultados percibidos de la implementación de acciones de conservación derivadas de las evaluaciones ecorregionales. Nuestros resultados sugieren la necesidad tanto de una mayor perspectiva de la contribución de las evaluaciones a las metas planeadas como de una evaluación posterior de las evaluaciones de conservación.

Ancillary