“Physiologic” Jaundice of the Newborn

Authors

  • Penny Simkin R.P.T.,

    1. Has a B.A. degree in English Literature and is a Registered Physical Therapist. A childbirth educator for the past 11 years, she has served on the Board of Directors of the International Childbirth Education Association (1972–1978), and is presently on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Parents and Professionals for Safe Alternatives in Childbirth. Address for reprints: 1100–23rd Ave. E., Seattle, WA 98112.
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  • Peter A. Simkin M.D.,

    1. Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He teaches the Musculo-Skeletal System course and is involved in research on synovial physiology and uric acid metabolism.
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  • Margot Edwards R.N., M.A.

    1. Has a BA in psychology and community studies and an MA in health education. She has served on the Board of Directors of the International Childbirth Education Association (1974–6) and is currently on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Parents and Professionals for Safe Alternatives in Childbirth. She is Director of Community Outreach of the Childbirth Education League of the Monterey Peninsula.
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: Bilirubin metabolism is reviewed and neonatal jaundice of various types is described. The need for quick, accurate tests for unbound, unconjugated bilirubin is discussed in relation to new suggestions that lower levels of this specific portion of bilirubin may cause damage in the newborn The benefits and risks of present treatments are evaluated.

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