An Evaluation of Childbirth Education for the Clinic Patient

Authors

  • Emanuel P. Gaziano M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hennepin County Medical Center, the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota and the Childbirth Education Association of Greater Minneapolis-St. Paul.
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  • Marlene Gar Vis R.N., M.S.,

    1. From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hennepin County Medical Center, the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota and the Childbirth Education Association of Greater Minneapolis-St. Paul.
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  • Elaine Levine B.S.

    1. From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hennepin County Medical Center, the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota and the Childbirth Education Association of Greater Minneapolis-St. Paul.
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  • Supported by grants from the following Foundations: Otto Bremer, Bush, McKnight, Minneapolis, Ripley Memorial and St. Paul.

Address reprint requests to Emanuel P. Gaziano, M.D., Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hennepin County Medical Center, 701 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55415

Abstract

ABSTRACT: A study was made of 97 clinic women who attended a series of preparation for childbirth classes and 24 primigravida clinic women who elected not to attend such classes. Both groups completed a standardized knowledge and understanding (KU) questionnaire related to pregnancy, labor and delivery. In addition, a post-delivery structured interview was undertaken to determine the relative importance of certain subjective variables relating to the labor and delivery experience. KU scores were significantly higher in clinic women who elected to attend such classes. Class attendance was associated with a significant increase in KU scores following 4 class sessions. An inverse correlation was observed between KU scores and the number of anesthesia encounters for prepared clinic women during first and second stage of labor. Prepared multigravidas had significantly fewer medication encounters than did prepared primigravidas (P <.001) and, as a group, prepared women had significantly fewer medication encounters than unprepared primigravid women (P <.001). Both groups of clinic women rated medication during labor of less importance than the presence of a labor companion.

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