Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Disorders Part II: Issues and Implications

Authors

  • Diane Beeson Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Diane Beeson is a medical sociologist at the Institute for the Study of Social Change, University of California, Berkeley, studying reproductive decision-making among parents at high risk of bearing children with muscular dystrophy and hemophilia. Her work is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development (08R1HD-13 897A).
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  • Rita Douglas M.A.,

    1. Rita Douglas is a genetic counselor at The University of California, San Francisco, Prenatal Detection Center where she has counseled prospective parents in prenatal diagnosis and genetics for eight years, and assists in the counseling of parents considering fetal surgery. She is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.
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  • Terry F. Lunsford J.D., Ph.D.

    1. Rita Douglas is a genetic counselor at The University of California, San Francisco, Prenatal Detection Center where she has counseled prospective parents in prenatal diagnosis and genetics for eight years, and assists in the counseling of parents considering fetal surgery. She is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.
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*Dr. Beeson, Institute for the Study of Social Change, 2420 Bowditch St., University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

ABSTRACT

Some of the important issues raised by genetic diagnosis include the psychological implications of parents waiting weeks for test results, aborting a defective fetus, accidentally aborting, learning that a fetus is unaffected, and learning the sex of a fetus. Some ethical and legal controversies and social policy issues are described. (BIRTH 10:4, Winter 1983)

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