Influence of Maternal Weight, Smoking, and Socioeconomic Status on Infant Triceps Skinfold Thickness and Growth During the First Year

Authors

  • L. Janette Taper Ph. D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. L. Janette Taper is an Associate Professor of Human Nutrition and Foods.
      Address correspondence to Dr. L. Janette Taper, Room 206 Wallace Hall, Department of Human Nutrition and Foods, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
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  • Mary Hayes M. S.,

    1. Mary Hayes was a graduate student in the Department of Human Nutrition and Foods.
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  • Cosby S. Rogers Ph. D.,

    1. Cosby S. Rogers is an Assistant Professor of Family and Child Development.
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  • Robert B. Frary Ph. D.

    1. Robert Frary is Assistant Director of the Research and Measuring Division, Learning Resources Center at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
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  • This research was supported by the Science and Education Administration of the U.S. Department of Agriculture under Grant No. 5901–0410–8–0143–0 from the Competitive Research Grants Office.

Address correspondence to Dr. L. Janette Taper, Room 206 Wallace Hall, Department of Human Nutrition and Foods, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: The effect of pregravid weight-for-height status, pregnancy weight gain, demographic factors, and smoking on several infant growth parameters from birth to eleven months of age was investigated in 120 mother/infant pairs. Pregravid weight-for-height status and total weight gain during pregnancy were positively related to infant birth weight but were not predictive of triceps skinfold measurements or changes in weight/length ratios from one to eleven months of age measured at bimonthly intervals. Although maternal smoking habits were related to lower infant birthweight, they did account for some increase in triceps measurements and changes in weight/length ratios at nine to eleven months of age. In light of the fact that maternal factors were not highly predictive of infant growth, except at birth, other factors in the early infant environment may play a more significant role in determining infant growth patterns.

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