Postpartum Depression: A Review

Authors

  • Dyanne D. Affonso Ph.D., F.A.A.N.,

    1. Dyanne D. Affonso, Ph.D., F.A.A.N., is Associate Professor, Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143. George Domino, Ph.D., is Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • George Domino Ph.D.

    1. Dyanne D. Affonso, Ph.D., F.A.A.N., is Associate Professor, Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143. George Domino, Ph.D., is Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Some studies link postpartum depression with the 4-day “blues,” and with severe postpartum mental illness, while other studies show differences between these or define each distinctly. Research on possible contributors to postpartum depression has moved from psychoanalytic and hormonal theories to factors in the pregnancy, birth, and postpartum periods. Interpersonal and adaptational models are presented in detail.

Ancillary