Compliance with Childbirth Education Classes in Second Stage Labor

Authors

  • Sandra G. Lindell R.N., M.S., C.N.M.,

    1. Sandra G. Lindell and Mary A. Rossi are instructors at the University of Minnesota Nurse-Midwifery Program, Unit F Health Sciences, 308 Harvard Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
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  • Mary A. Rossi R.N., M.S., C.N.M.

    1. Sandra G. Lindell and Mary A. Rossi are instructors at the University of Minnesota Nurse-Midwifery Program, Unit F Health Sciences, 308 Harvard Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This research was partly funded by the Irene G. Ramey Research Award, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, and by the Nurse-Midwifery Program Grant 2024–NUO-0133-DHHS.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Studies have compared the outcomes of those who attend childbirth education classes with those who do not. In this study, 28 women were asked to recount the instructions they had been given for breathing techniques and body positioning and to consider what positions and breathing techniques they might like to try during second stage when given the freedom and support to choose. The study found that many women did not comply with instructions given in childbirth classes when they delivered in an environment which supported their responding to their own instincts for birthing. Ten (59%) of 17 taught traditional pushing did not maintain the position they were taught, and 16 (94%) did not hold their breath and push as taught. However, if their childbirth educator instructed them to use a variety of positions or to do what was most comfortable in second stage, women did comply.

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