How Can Aspiration of Vomitus in Obstetrics Best Be Prevented?

Authors

  • Susan McKay R.N., Ph.D., A.C.C.E.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Psychologist in private practice and Associate Professor at the University of Wyoming School of Nursing, Laramie, Wyoming 82071.
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  • Charles Mahan M.D., F.A.C.O.G.

    1. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Florida College of Medicine and Deputy Secretary for Health and State Health Officer, State of Florida, 2705 Blairstone Lane, Tallahasee, Florida 32301.
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Address correspondence to Susan McKay, R.N., Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Wyoming School of Nursing, Laramie, Wyoming 80271.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Concern about the incidence of maternal aspiration and its effect upon maternal morbidity and mortality has resulted in restricting oral intake of laboring women, although data show maternal death to be rare. Among many factors that can be linked to the occurrence of aspiration, the most important appears to be faulty administration of obstetric anesthesia.

Ancillary