Sleep Disturbances, Vitality, and Fatigue Among a Select Group of Employed Childbearing Women

Authors

  • Kathryn A. Lee RN, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Kathryn Lee is un assistant professor and Jeanne DeJoseph is an associate professor in the Department of Family Health Cure Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco, California.
      Address correspondence to Dr. Kathryn Lee, University of California, School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing, Room N-411-Y, Box 0606, San Francisco, CA 94143–0606.
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  • Jeanne F. DeJoseph CNM, PhD, FAAN

    1. Kathryn Lee is un assistant professor and Jeanne DeJoseph is an associate professor in the Department of Family Health Cure Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco, California.
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  • This project was conducted during a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Nurse Scholar postdoctoral fellowship. Funding for data analysis was provided by Biomedical Research Support grunt SO7 #RR05604, National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kathryn Lee, University of California, School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing, Room N-411-Y, Box 0606, San Francisco, CA 94143–0606.

ABSTRACT

Self-reported sleep disturbances and levels of vitality and fatigue were studied in a secondary analysis of 25 pregnant and 29 postpartum employed women. Results indicate that pregnant women have problems initiating and maintaining sleep, and postpartum women have problems maintaining sleep, but not falling asleep. The primary reason for midsleep awakenings was urinary frequency among the pregnant women, and child care responsibilities among the postpartum women. Chronic sleep disturbance was indicated by a greater percentage of postpartum women who fell asleep easily, very few who felt highly energetic at work, and most who perceived a high level of fatigue during the past week. Even with these sleep disruptions, no differences occurred in the mean scores for perception of fatigue und vitality between the two groups. Clinicians can use these findings to educate women about some changes they may anticipate and how they might manage them during pregnancy and postpartum

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