Does Breastfeeding Empower Women? Insights from a Select Group of Educated, Low-Income, Minority Women

Authors

  • Maryanne P. Locklin RNC, MS, IBCLC,

    1. Maryanne P. Locklin is an obstetric and pediatric Clinical Specialist at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, Melrose Park, and doctoral candidate at Rush University, College of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois.
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  • Sarah J. Naber CNM, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Sarah Naber is Associate Chairperson of the Department of Maternal-Child Nursing at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center and Assistant Professor, Rush University, College of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois.
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Address correspondence to Sarah J. Naber, CNM, PhD, Associate Chairperson, Department of Maternal-Child Nursing, Rush–Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, 1653 W. Congress Parkway, 8 Jones, Chicago, IL 60612.

ABSTRACT

A grounded theory study examined the breastfeeding experiences of a small group of educated, low-income, minority women. In-depth interviews were used to collect data. The five themes that emerged as primary descriptors of the experience were against all odds, personal motivation, support, attachment, and telling the world. These themes help to identify the factors that enhanced successful breastfeeding among this select sample of women, and demonstrate that the perception of successful breastfeeding can have an empowering effect on women.

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