Nausea and Fatigue During Early Pregnancy

Authors

  • Donna van Lier PhD, RN, CNM,

    Corresponding author
    1. Donna van Lier is a nurse-midwife with Atlanta Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates; Brigitte Manteuffel is at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; Colleen DiIorio is Associate Professor and Director at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; and Marsha Stalcup is a nurse-midwife at Prucare, in Atlanta, Georgia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brigitte Manteuffel MA,

    1. Donna van Lier is a nurse-midwife with Atlanta Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates; Brigitte Manteuffel is at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; Colleen DiIorio is Associate Professor and Director at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; and Marsha Stalcup is a nurse-midwife at Prucare, in Atlanta, Georgia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Colleen Dilorio PhD, RN, FAAN,

    1. Donna van Lier is a nurse-midwife with Atlanta Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates; Brigitte Manteuffel is at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; Colleen DiIorio is Associate Professor and Director at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; and Marsha Stalcup is a nurse-midwife at Prucare, in Atlanta, Georgia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marsha Stalcup CNM, RN

    1. Donna van Lier is a nurse-midwife with Atlanta Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates; Brigitte Manteuffel is at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; Colleen DiIorio is Associate Professor and Director at the Nursing Research Center at Emory University; and Marsha Stalcup is a nurse-midwife at Prucare, in Atlanta, Georgia.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence to Donna van Lier, PhD, RN, 1079 Brittany Way, Norcross, GA 30093.

ABSTRACT:

Nausea and fatigue are uncomfortable, sometimes almost debilitating, symptoms of pregnancy. Anecdotally, fatigue seems worse as nausea increases. This descriptive correlational study investigated the relationship between nausea and fatigue during early pregnancy. Fifty-one women who received prenatal care at two obstetrics and gynecology nurse-midwifery practices in a large metropolitan area participated. Each women completed a nausea questionnaire, the Pearson-Byars fatigue feeling checklist, and a demographic data sheet at her first or second prenatal visit. Participants were at less than 17 weeks' gestation; 43 percent were pregnant for the first time, and48 percent reported nausea at the time they completed the questionnaire. Women with severe nausea had higher levels of fatigue than those with no or mild and moderate nausea. Severity of nausea and level of fatigue were positively correlated, indicating that as nausea increased so did the severity of fatigue.

Ancillary