Maternal-Fetal Attachment and Perceived Relationships With Important Others in Adolescents

Authors

  • Jan Wayland PhD, RN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Jan Wayland is Assistant Professor and Starla Tate is Clinical Instructor, Perinatal Nursing, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas.
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  • Starla Tate MNSc, RN

    1. Jan Wayland is Assistant Professor and Starla Tate is Clinical Instructor, Perinatal Nursing, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence to Jan Wayland, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Perinatal Nursing, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing, 4301 West Markham, Slot 529, Little Rock, AR 72205.

ABSTRACT

We examined associations between maternal-fetal attachment and the pregnant adolescent's perceived relationships with her mother and the baby's father. Questionnaires were administered in health department prenatal clinics to a sample of 61 Mexican-American, African-American, and Caucasian adolescents at 13 to 40 weeks' gestation. Each woman completed Cranley's maternal-fetal attachment scale (MFAS), an investigator-developed relationship with mother scale and a survey instrument that assessed living situation, perceptions of the relationship with the baby's father, and standard demographic variables. Scores on the MFAS significantly correlated with the adolescent's perceived close relationships with her mother and the baby's father, frequency of contact with the baby's father, gestation, and marital status. Mexican-American adolescents scored significantly lower on the MFAS than Caucasian adolescents. The scale needs further testing in multiethnic groups of adults and adolescents.

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