Encouraging Women to Consider a Less Medicalized Approach to Childbirth Without Turning Them Off: Challenges to Producing Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth

Authors

  • Kiki Zeldes,

    Corresponding author
    1. 1Kiki Zeldes is the web manager for Our Bodies Ourselves and is co-editor of Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth; Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause; and the 2005 edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves. 2Judy Norsigian is Executive Director of Our Bodies Ourselves and co-author of all U.S editions of Our Bodies, Ourselves.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • and 1 Judy Norsigian 2

    1. 1Kiki Zeldes is the web manager for Our Bodies Ourselves and is co-editor of Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth; Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause; and the 2005 edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves. 2Judy Norsigian is Executive Director of Our Bodies Ourselves and co-author of all U.S editions of Our Bodies, Ourselves.
    Search for more papers by this author

Kiki Zeldes, kiki@bwhbc.org.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Within the United States, women routinely confront negative and distorted ideas about birth, and highly medicalized births are the norm. The writers and editors of Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth discuss their efforts to write a book that provides women with accessible, evidence-based information; examines the social, economic, and political factors that shape and constrain childbirth choices; and inspires women to work toward ensuring that all women have access to the full range of safe and satisfying birthing options. (BIRTH 35:3 September 2008)

Ancillary