Get access

In the Literature: Dispelling Hallucinations About Birthweight: How Hard Is It?

Authors

  • Marc J.N.C. Keirse MD, DPhil, DPH, FRCOG, FRANZCOG,

    Corresponding author
    • Professor of obstetrics and gynaecology at Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mandana Master BPharm, MBBS,

    1. Flinders medical graduate and trainee at the Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kamila Plutzer BDS, MSocSc, GDPH, PhD

    1. Kamila Plutzer is a Research Fellow at the Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • COMMENTARY ON: Sajjadian N, Shajari H, Jahadi R, Barakat MG, Sajjadian A. Relationship between birth weight and time of first deciduous tooth eruption in 143 consecutively born infants. Pediatr Neonatol 2010;51:235–237.

Address correspondence to Marc J.N.C. Keirse, Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Medicine, Flinders University, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.

Abstract

Birthweight is an important determinant of perinatal outcome and future health well into adulthood. Before weighing newborn infants became enshrined in practice, birthweights tended to be based on an educated guess or, as alleged by Roederer in 1753, on hallucination. Two centuries later, they led to a Babylonic confusion between weight and maturity at birth. Even nowadays, hallucinations about birthweight and its effect on infant health have not entirely disappeared. New hallucinations still emerge and remain as difficult to dispel as they once were. (BIRTH 39:3 September 2012)

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary