Arterial Plasma Vasopressin and Aldosterone Predict Left Ventricular Mass in Men Who Develop Hypertension Over 20 Years

Authors

  • Arne H. Strand MD,

    1. From the Departments of Cardiology1 and Nephrology,2Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI3
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  • 1 Helga Gudmundsdottir MD,

    1. From the Departments of Cardiology1 and Nephrology,2Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI3
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  • 2 Eigil Fossum MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Cardiology1 and Nephrology,2Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI3
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  • 1 Ingrid Os MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Cardiology1 and Nephrology,2Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI3
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  • 2 Reidar Bjørnerheim MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Cardiology1 and Nephrology,2Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI3
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  • and 1 Sverre E. Kjeldsen MD, PhD 1,3

    1. From the Departments of Cardiology1 and Nephrology,2Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI3
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Arne Strand, MD, Department of Cardiology, Ullevaal Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, N-0407 Oslo, Norway
E-mail: a.h.strand@medisin.uio.no

Abstract

Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is related to blood pressure level and neurohormonal factors. The authors previously demonstrated that arterial norepinephrine levels predict LV mass in middle-aged men who developed hypertension through 20 years. The aim of this 20-year prospective study was to investigate arterial vasopressin, aldosterone, and renin as long-term predictors of LV mass. Normotensives (n=17), subjects who developed hypertension (n=17), and sustained hypertensives (n=22) were compared at baseline (42 years) and at follow-up (62 years). There were no significant differences in baseline vasopressin, aldosterone, or renin levels. The group with sustained hypertension had more LV hypertrophy (P=.025) at follow-up. Among new hypertensives, multiple regression analysis demonstrated that baseline arterial vasopressin (β-0.53; P=.041) and aldosterone (β-0.56;P=.032) independently explained LV mass index (R2=0.85; P=.035). In conclusion, baseline arterial vasopressin and aldosterone, but not renin, appear to predict LV mass in middle-aged men who developed hypertension over a 20-year period.

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