Failure of Chronic Pallidal Stimulation in Dystonic Patients Is a Medical Emergency

Authors

  • John Yianni MRCS,

    1. The Oxford Movement Disorder Group, Department of Neurological Surgery, The Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford;
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  • Dipankar Nandi,

    1. The Oxford Movement Disorder Group, Department of Neurological Surgery, The Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford;
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  • M. Ch,

    1. Division of Neurosciences and Psychological Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital Campus;
    2. University Department of Physiology, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom
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  • Jonathan Hyam MB, BS,

    1. Division of Neurosciences and Psychological Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital Campus;
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  • Vanessa Elliott MB, BS,

    1. Division of Neurosciences and Psychological Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital Campus;
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  • Peter Bain FRCP,

    1. Division of Neurosciences and Psychological Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital Campus;
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  • Ralph Gregory FRCP,

    1. The Oxford Movement Disorder Group, Department of Neurological Surgery, The Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford;
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  • Tipu Aziz , FRCS

    Corresponding author
    1. The Oxford Movement Disorder Group, Department of Neurological Surgery, The Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford;
    2. Division of Neurosciences and Psychological Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital Campus;
    3. University Department of Physiology, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Prof. T. Z. Aziz, Department of Neurological Surgery, The Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK. E-mail: tipu.aziz@physiol.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is a continually expanding field of functional neurosurgery for the treatment of movement disorders and neuropathic pain. However, occurrence of adverse events related to implanted hardware cannot be ignored, particularly in patients with dystonic conditions. We report on two such patients who required emergency hospital admission and pulse generator re-implantation following sudden and unexpected cessation of DBS effectiveness resulting from battery failure.

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