Benign vascular tumors of female genital tract

Authors


Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Dr Nita Khurana, M.D., C 5A/64, Janakpuri, New Delhi 110058, India. Email: nitakhurana@rediffmail.com

Abstract

Vascular tumors are rare in female genital tract (FGT). The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of vascular tumors in FGT and to highlight their clinicopathologic features. As a retrospective study, clinical features including imaging studies, gross findings, and microscopic features of cases (ten) diagnosed as having vascular tumors of FGT over 4 years were reviewed. The age range of our cases was 12–52 years. The presenting complaint was abdominal pain/mass, postcoital bleeding, and vaginal and vulval mass. In most cases, duration of symptoms was 6 months to 2 years. Only one case had a long-standing history of 8 years. The vascular tumors occurred most commonly in ovary (six), followed by vulva (two), and one each in cervix and vagina. Clinical diagnoses ranged from cystadenoma in ovarian tumors to endocervical polyp in cervical tumor. Histologically, all were benign vascular neoplasms, ranging from hemangioma (five), lymphangioma (one), lymphangioma circumscriptum (one) to angiomatosis (two) and arteriovenous malformation (one). Thus, we conclude that vascular lesions in FGT can present with symptoms similar to epithelial malignancies and may lead to unwarranted radical surgery. Vascular lesions of cervix and vulvovaginal region pose special problem during pregnancy. Risk of Kasabach–Merritt coagulopathy has to be considered in larger vascular tumors. Most of these cases can be treated by surgery.

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