Evaluation of a Worksite Wellness Program: Impact on Exercise, Weight, Smoking, and Stress

Authors

  • Jacqueline Blank Sherman R.N., Ph.D.,

    1. Jacqueline Blank Sherman is Assistant Professor, Lauren Clark is Research Associate, and Marylyn McEwen is Lecturer at the University of Arizona, College of Nursing, Tucson, AZ 85721.
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  • Lauren Clark R.N., M.S.,

    1. Jacqueline Blank Sherman is Assistant Professor, Lauren Clark is Research Associate, and Marylyn McEwen is Lecturer at the University of Arizona, College of Nursing, Tucson, AZ 85721.
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  • Marylyn M. McEwen R.N., M.S.

    1. Jacqueline Blank Sherman is Assistant Professor, Lauren Clark is Research Associate, and Marylyn McEwen is Lecturer at the University of Arizona, College of Nursing, Tucson, AZ 85721.
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  • Research for this article was supported by a grant from the University of Arizona Foundation.

Abstract

This study evaluated the effects of a wellness program at the workplace in relation to its impact on exercise, weight, smoking, and stress of the employee participants. A quasi-experimental design was selected in which data were collected at three specific intervals: before and immediately after program completion, and three months after program completion. The sample consisted of experimental and control groups. Persons (n = 59) who did participate in the wellness program made up the experimental group, and those (n = 49) who did not participate in the wellness program served as controls. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. No significant differences were noted between participants and nonparticipants in the areas of exercise, weight, smoking, and stress between the initial evaluation and after completing the wellness program. The areas of stress reduction and increased exercise were emphasized more in the participants than the nonparticipants, however.

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