The Mutual-Participation Relationship: Key to Facilitating Self-Care Practices in Clients and Families

Authors

  • Betty L. Pesznecker R.N., M.N.,

    1. Belly L. Pesznecker is Associate Professor and Co-Principal Investigator, Elderly Homecare Project, Joyce V. Zerwekh is Lecturer, and Barbara J. Horn is Professor and Principal Investigator, Elderly Homecare Project at the Community Health Care Systems, SM-24 School of Nursing University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195
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  • Joyce V. Zerwekh R.N., M.A.,

    1. Belly L. Pesznecker is Associate Professor and Co-Principal Investigator, Elderly Homecare Project, Joyce V. Zerwekh is Lecturer, and Barbara J. Horn is Professor and Principal Investigator, Elderly Homecare Project at the Community Health Care Systems, SM-24 School of Nursing University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195
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  • Barbara J. Horn R.N., M.N., Ph.D.

    1. Belly L. Pesznecker is Associate Professor and Co-Principal Investigator, Elderly Homecare Project, Joyce V. Zerwekh is Lecturer, and Barbara J. Horn is Professor and Principal Investigator, Elderly Homecare Project at the Community Health Care Systems, SM-24 School of Nursing University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195
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  • Preparation of this article was funded in part by the Elderly Homecare Project, Fred Meyer Charitable Trust, grant 85070332.

Abstract

The relationship among formal providers, clients, and families in home care is critical. If clients and family care givers are to develop adequate and safe self-care practices, they must be involved in mutual decision making concerning issues related to the illness and the care to be given. A relationship of mutual participation involves facilitating and negotiating goals with clients and their family members.

Ancillary