AIDS Education on the College Campus: Roy's Adaptation Model Directs Inquiry

Authors

  • Angela E. Vicenzi Ed.D., R.N.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Angela E. Vicenzi and Robert Thiel are affiliated with Southern Connecticut State University, School of Professional Studies.
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  • Robert Thiel Ph.D.

    1. Angela E. Vicenzi and Robert Thiel are affiliated with Southern Connecticut State University, School of Professional Studies.
    Search for more papers by this author

*Address correspondence to Dr. Angela E. Vicenzi, 168 East Rocks Road, Norwalk. CT 06851.

Abstract

Abstract We assessed the beliefs of 49 college students regarding the acquired immunodoficiency syndrome (AIDS), condom use, and sexual behaviors related to AIDS prevention. Roy's modes of self-concept, interdependence, and role function were used as a framework to find psychosocial determinants that influence safer sex practices. Interdependence was measured by a sexual regard scale. Beliefs regarding both AIDS beliefs and condom were very positive. Students were selectively using safer sex practices; most reported avoiding high-risk partners, but only 39% were using condoms. No significant associations were found among the four independent measures of AIDS beliefs, condom beliefs, self-esteem, and sexual regard or with the dependent measure. AIDS safer sex practices. A two-hour safer sex educational module did change several beliefs but did not increase safer sex practices. Most participating students stated they had a good understanding of how AIDS was spread, they knew how to use condoms correctly, and they discussed AIDS with friends and parents.

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