Blood Pressure Comparison in a Selected Native American and White Population

Authors

  • Diane M. Helgeson R.N., M.S.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Diane M. Helgeson is associate professor, and Carol L. Berg is assistant professor, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota. Nyla Juhl is chair, Family and Community Nursing, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota.
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  • Carol L. Berg R.N., M.S.,

    1. Diane M. Helgeson is associate professor, and Carol L. Berg is assistant professor, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota. Nyla Juhl is chair, Family and Community Nursing, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nyla Juhl Ph.D., R.N.

    1. Diane M. Helgeson is associate professor, and Carol L. Berg is assistant professor, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota. Nyla Juhl is chair, Family and Community Nursing, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota.
    Search for more papers by this author

*Address correspondence to Diane M. Helgeson, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, P.O. Box 8195, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8195.

Abstract

Abstract This study compared the frequency of blood pressure elevation in a selected Native American and white population. Three hundred individuals participated: 87 Native Americans, 210 whites, and 3 others. Data were gathered using a questionnaire that addressed residence, sex. age, race, occupation, height, smoking, alcohol use. tea/coffee consumption, medications, and past or present illness. Weight and blood pressure were measured by the researchers at the time of data collection. The sample mean for systolic blood pressure (SBP) was 124 mm Hg (SD 14.78) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was 77 mm Hg (SD 10.13). One-way analysis of variance showed age groups and sex to affect blood pressure significantly (P= 0.0001). Stepwise multiple regression indicated weight significantly predicted blood pressure (SBP multiple R = 0.39, P= 0.001; DBP multiple R = 0.43, P= 0.00001). The interaction of age, sex, tobacco, alcohol, and caffeine influenced SBP and DBP. Obviously, these findings have limited generalizeability due to the sampling frame used in this study.

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