Responsibilities and Reactions of Family Caregivers of Patients Dependent on Total Parenteral Nutrition at Home

Authors

  • Carol E. Smith R.N., Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Carol E. Smith and Jill Allard Ross are with the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Lois Moushey is a home health nurse with the Shawnee Mission Medical Center. Cheryl Gieffer is with the Pittsburg State University School of Nursing.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lois Moushey R.N., M.A.,

    1. Carol E. Smith and Jill Allard Ross are with the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Lois Moushey is a home health nurse with the Shawnee Mission Medical Center. Cheryl Gieffer is with the Pittsburg State University School of Nursing.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jill Allard Ross R.N., M.N.,

    1. Carol E. Smith and Jill Allard Ross are with the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Lois Moushey is a home health nurse with the Shawnee Mission Medical Center. Cheryl Gieffer is with the Pittsburg State University School of Nursing.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cheryl Gieffer R.N., M.S.

    1. Carol E. Smith and Jill Allard Ross are with the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Lois Moushey is a home health nurse with the Shawnee Mission Medical Center. Cheryl Gieffer is with the Pittsburg State University School of Nursing.
    Search for more papers by this author

*Address correspondence to Carol E. Smith, School of Nursing, 39th and Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66103.

Abstract

Abstract This prospective study assessed the caregiving responsibilities and reactions of family members who provide home care to a relative who is dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). A short, semistructured interview based on the Roy adaptation model was used to gather data about the caregiving experiences of 20 relatives of adult TPN-dependent patients. Data were content analyzed, and frequently occurring themes identified. Results indicated that altered family responsibilities as well as negative and positive psychologic reactions to caregiving do occur. The interviews suggested that caregivers master TPN technology but make little use of assistance from extended family or professionals. Although depression and fatigue were reported as common, these family members felt capable and successful in their caregiving roles. Further longitudinal research with larger samples should allow for comparison of caregivers on demographic differnces, stress, and other variables pertinent to managing complex home care.

Ancillary