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Abstract AIDS has shifted from an acute short-term terminal illness to a progressive, chronic disorder. Evaluation of AIDS case-management is imperative due to both the increasing numbers of cases and the lengthened survival of those with the disease. In 1988 the Missouri Department of Health (MDOH) initiated the first statewide system of AIDS case-management in the United States. This study was done to determine if deceased AIDS clients who received MDOH case-management services had fewer inpatient hospital days than clients who did not receive these services, during the last six months of life. Death certificates and Medicaid records were merged for 100 case-managed and 99 control, non-case-managed AIDS clients. No significant difference between groups was found in number of inpatient hospital days. Further, neither age, ethnicity, gender, cause of death, nor specific AIDS risk factors were associated with total number of inpatient hospital days. The client-centered philosophy of the program may have encouraged case managers to utilize all available service, including hospitalization, without considering cost-containment issues. Future evaluation efforts will investigate both cost-containment and quality-of-life indicators, such as satisfaction with care, of case-managed AIDS clients.