Women with Diabetes during Pregnancy: Sociodemographics, Outcomes, and Costs of Care

Authors

  • Ruth York Ph.D., FAAN,

    1. Ruth York and Linda P. Brown are with the Division of Women's Health and Childbearing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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  • Linda P. Brown Ph.D., FAAN

    1. Ruth York and Linda P. Brown are with the Division of Women's Health and Childbearing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Abstract This study provides sociodemographic, outcome, and cost data on a population (N= 55) of predominately low-income, diabetic women who were hospitalized during pregnancy. Study findings indicated that 43 percent received no prenatal care in the first trimester, 20 percent delivered a low-birthweight infant, 47 percent had a cesarean delivery, and 63 percent reported an annual income under $12,500. Following the women's initial admission for glucose control, 19 acute care visits and 32 rehospitalizations were recorded for them. The mean hospital charges for antepartum initial hospitalization for glucose control were $4,665 (4.3 days). The mean charges for postpartum hospitalization were $7,793 (4.3 days). The mean hospital charges per infant were $12,991. Given the data presented in this study, it is imperative that monies be targeted to provide a broad spectrum of health care services that will meet the unique needs of this population. These services should address not only the needs related to superimposed disease state but also identify mechanisms to assist women to receive care prior to conception, or at the very least to begin prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy.

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