Developing a Collaborative Community Partnership Program in Medical Asepsis with Tattoo Studios

Authors

  • Gregory A. Bechtel Ph.D., M.P.H., R.N.,

    1. Gregory A. Bechtel is with the College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University. Christina Garrett and Susan Grover are with East Tennessee State University.
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  • Christina Garrett R.N., B.S.N.,

    1. Gregory A. Bechtel is with the College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University. Christina Garrett and Susan Grover are with East Tennessee State University.
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  • Susan Grover Ph.D., R.N.

    1. Gregory A. Bechtel is with the College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University. Christina Garrett and Susan Grover are with East Tennessee State University.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Abstract The possibility of transmission of infectious agents during tattooing has become a legitimate issue of concern for health care providers. A collaborative educational program was developed by a county health department, College of Nursing, and tattoo artists to address issues of medical asepsis with the goal of producing a mechanism for certification of tattoo studios. The group's effort was enhanced by recognizing each other's value systems and by the mutual need for a successful program. A framework for developing, implementing, and evaluating community partnerships was addressed. This program demonstrated that community health nurses can play an instrumental role in collaborating with both health care providers and personal-service workers to minimize transmission of infectious agents during cosmetic procedures.

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