Effectiveness of Counseling in the Health Promotion of HIV-Positive Clients in the Community

Authors

  • Sally DiScenza M.S.N., R.N.,

    1. Sally DiScenza is Nurse Practitioner, Adult Special Care Clinic, the Regional Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
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  • Mary Nies Ph.D., R.N., FAAN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Mary Nies (formerly Albrecht) is Associate Professor, College of Nursing, College of Medicine, Memphis.
      Address correspondence to Mary Nies, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, College of Nursing, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Memphis, 327 Angelus Street, Memphis, TN 38112.
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  • Cynthia Jordan Ed.D.

    1. Cynthia Jordan is Assistant Professor, Academic Support Services, University of Tennessee, Memphis.
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Address correspondence to Mary Nies, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, College of Nursing, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Memphis, 327 Angelus Street, Memphis, TN 38112.

Abstract

Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a nurse's counseling intervention on high-risk sexual behaviors of HIV-positive patients and to explore the relationship of gender, race, age, and education to high-risk sexual behaviors. A convenience sample of 20 adults who were newly diagnosed with HIV and were being treated at an inner-city out-patient clinic was used. Subjects were administered a questionnaire to determine their precounseling AIDS knowledge and precounseling sexual behaviors. A registered nurse then counseled them about safe-sex practices. After 2-3 months the questionnaire was readminis tered to determine the effects of counseling on AIDS knowledge and high-risk sexual behaviors. Although statistical analysis indicated a significant main effect for change in high-risk sexual behaviors after counseling, there were no significant relationships among change and the individual demographic variables of age, gender, race, and education. Pretest knowledge was not found to influence pretest behavior, nor was posttest knowledge found to affect posttest behavior. Paired t tests indicated a significant change in high-risk sexual behavior scores after counseling but no significant change in knowledge scores.

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