Resources, Stigma, and Patterns of Disclosure in Rural Women with HIV Infection

Authors

  • Richard L. Sowell Ph.D., R.N., FAAN,

    1. Richard Sowell is Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Administrative and Clinical Nursing, College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia; at the time of this study Dr. Sowell was Director of Research and Program Services, AID Atlanta, Inc.
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  • Arlene Lowenstein Ph.D.,

    1. Arlene Lowenstein is Director of Graduate Program in Nursing. MGH Institute for Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts.
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  • Linda Moneyham R.N., D.N.S.,

    1. Linda Moneyham is Assistant professor. Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
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  • Alice Demi R.N., D.N.Sc., FAAN,

    1. Alice Demi is Professor. School of Nursing, Georgia State University, Atlanta.
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  • Yuko Mizuno Ph.D.,

    1. Yuko Mizuno is Program Coordinator for the Family Coping Project, AID Atlanta, Inc.
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  • Brenda F. Seals Ph.D.

    1. Brenda F. Seals is a Research Associate at Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston.
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Address Correspondence to Richard Sowell. Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, Department of Administrative and Clinical Nursing, College of Nursing. University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.

Abstract

Abstract A growing number of cases of HIV infection are being diagnosed in rural communities especially among women. Although HIV-specific education and care delivery programs have been focused on rural areas in recent years, limited data are available on the impact of such initiatives on the lives of women with HIV infection. The purpose of this study was to examine characteristics of women with HIV disease living in rural communities. The study used a cross-sectional sample of rural women in Georgia. Data analysis indicated that although a majority of the women reported adequate resources, there was a group of women for whom resources for basic needs were not always adequate. Additionally, women with HIV who had not progressed to AIDS had greater difficulty in obtaining a number

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