The Measles Initiative to Control Measles in Kenya

Authors

  • Charlotte A. Bradsher,

    1. D.N.Sc., R.N., is Adjunct Faculty, DNP Program, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
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  • R. Craig Stotts,

    1. Dr.P.H., R.N., is Professor and Public Health Option Coordinator, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
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  • Michael A. Carter,

    1. D.N.Sc., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., B.C., F.A.A.N., is University Distinguished Professor, Primary Care and Public Health Department, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
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  • Mark Grabowsky

    1. M.D., M.P.H., is Senior Advisor, International Health, American Red Cross, Washington, DC 20006
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Charlotte A. Bradsher, 3710 Vanderschaff Drive, Memphis, TN, 38133. E-mail: cabradsher@aol.com

Abstract

ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the epidemiology of measles in Kenya and evaluate the Measles Initiative's (MI's) mass immunization campaign and its impact on measles control in Kenya.

Methods: This descriptive study focused on evaluating the MI's simultaneous mass campaigns in the provinces of Kenya, the implementation process of the campaign strategy, post-campaign impact data, and precampaign measles trends. Secondary data were obtained from the Kenya Ministry of Health and MI documentation involving vaccine coverage, and morbidity and mortality rates. Analysis focused on program achievement with a comparison of immunization coverage results and program goals.

Outcomes: Campaign goals of vaccination coverage were successfully achieved, and subsequent surveillance data indicate significant decreases in measles morbidity and mortality. Barriers to participation, sociocultural factors, and environmental demographics were identified and addressed.

Implications: The success of the MI immunization program was the result of the commitment of expert international public health agencies in partnership with the Kenyan government. The strategies used for this successful public health activity can be applied to improve vaccination programs in other countries.

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