Body Mass Index and Intake of Selected Foods in African American Men

Authors

  • Sally P. Weinrich,

    1. Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is Professor and Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar, School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia,
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  • Julie Priest,

    1. M.S.P.H., is Research Assistant, GlaxoSmithKline Department of Health Management Innovations, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina,
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  • William Reynolds,

    1. M.S., is Research Assistant, School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina,
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  • Paul A. Godley,

    1. M.D., Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Physician Consultant, Department of Medicine and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina,
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  • Wayne Tuckson,

    1. M.D., is Physician Consultant, Kentuckiana Colon and Rectal Surgery, Louisville, Kentucky
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  • Martin Weinrich

    1. Ph.D., is Professor, School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia
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Sally P. Weinrich, School of Nursing, EC-4305, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912. E-mail: sweinrich@mcg.edu

Abstract

ABSTRACT Background: There are minimal data on the relationship between dietary consumption of fats, vegetables, and fruits and body mass index (BMI) in African American men.

Objective: This study tested the relationships between selected dietary consumption and BMI.

Design: The sample was a community-based cohort of 204 African American Southern men who attended a free prostate cancer educational and screening program. The screening was part of an all-day African American celebration that included a health fair. Diet was assessed with a Brief Dietary Scale for Selected Food Intake and Preparation.

Results: Most of the men were overweight (34%) or obese (47%). The majority of men ate their chicken (90%) and fish (96%) fried. Few men ate vegetables at supper (29.4%) or lunch (15.8%). Three fatty food items were significantly associated with BMI: leaving the chicken skin on chicken (p=.03); intake of low-fat or skim milk (p=.02); and cooking vegetables with butter (p=.03).

Conclusion: African American men need culturally appropriate dietary interventions to reduce obesity.

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