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A Fish Consumption Study of Anglers in an At-Risk Community: A Community-Based Participatory Approach to Risk Reduction

Authors

  • Corliss G. Derrick,

    1. D.N.P., R.N., is Assistant Professor and Academic Clinical Coordinator, School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia,
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  • Jacqueline S. A. Miller,

    1. D.N.P., R.N., is Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia,
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  • Jeannette M. Andrews

    1. Ph.D., A.P.R.N.-B.C., F.N.P., is Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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Corliss G. Derrick, School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912. E-mail: coderrick@mcg.edu

Abstract

ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the effectiveness of a community-partnered risk communication intervention tailored for subsistence anglers in a public housing community.

Design and sample: A one group, pretest, posttest design was used to test the effectiveness of the intervention in a sample (n=23, age range 18–75 years, 100% African American) of subsistence anglers residing in a public housing community in close proximity to a Superfund clean-up site. Face-to-face surveys were conducted at baseline and 3 months post the intervention to assess changes in knowledge and behaviors.

Intervention: A socioculturally appropriate risk communication intervention was developed, implemented, and evaluated in the targeted community. The risk communication included an interactive power point presentation, visual demonstration by a role model, and distribution of low literacy written materials, followed by a booster mailing of materials 1 month past the initial intervention. Evaluation measures included survey instruments on knowledge and self-reported fishing behaviors.

Results: Participants showed improved knowledge and behavior change related to trimming fish, consumption by pregnant women and children, and consumption of large fish.

Conclusions: The sociocultured tailored risk communication intervention demonstrated promising outcomes in this community and should be evaluated in a larger population of subsistence anglers.

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