Factors Affecting Satisfaction Levels of Japanese Volunteers in Meal Delivery Services for the Elderly

Authors

  • Hisayo Yanagisawa,

    1. M.Edu., R.N., P.H.N., is Professor, Department of Community Health Nursing, Ibaraki Christian University School of Nursing, Ibaraki, Japan.
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  • Hisataka Sakakibara

    1. Ph.D., M.D., is Professor, Department of Public Health and Home Nursing, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Nagoya, Japan
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Hisayo Yanagisawa, Department of Community Health Nursing, Ibaraki Christian University School of Nursing, Ibaraki, 6-11-1 omika-cho, Hitachi-si, Ibaraki 319-1295, Japan. E-mail: yanagisawa@icc.ac.jp

Abstract

ABSTRACT Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors affecting satisfaction with volunteer work of participants in a meal delivery service for the elderly.

Design: A cross-sectional study with a self-administered survey was carried out.

Sample: Of 364 volunteers assisting with a meal delivery service for the elderly in rural towns A (80), B (159), and C (125), 247 responded (response rate: 68%).

Method: An anonymous self-administered questionnaire survey was administered seeking information about basic attributes, sense of satisfaction with volunteer work, and working circumstances such as human relationships with fellow volunteers, meal service users or professional staff members, opportunities for meetings or workshop, publicity through public relations magazines, and the like.

Results: In multivariate logistic analysis, the sense of satisfaction of volunteers was closely associated with human relations among volunteers (odds ratio [OR] 5.15, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.84–14.40, p<.01), meal service users (OR 3.84, 95% CI 1.37–10.77, p<.05), and professional staff members supervising the meal delivery service (OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.27–9.84, p<.05). Human relations were also affected by the emphasis on communication, consultation with supervisory staff members, having opportunities for meetings, having friends with whom to confer, and publicity through public relations magazines.

Conclusion: Satisfaction levels of volunteers in meal delivery services for the elderly were most affected by human relations with fellow volunteers, meal service users, and professional staff members. Increasing opportunities for communication may be important to promote good human relationships among volunteers and volunteer activities.

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