Barriers and Enablers to the Use of Measures to Prevent Pediatric Scalding in Cape Town, South Africa

Authors

  • Ashley Van Niekerk,

    1. Ph.D., is Specialist Scientist, Crime, Violence and Injury Lead Programme, Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa
    2. Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ewa Menckel,

    1. Ph.D., is Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lucie Laflamme

    1. Ph.D., is Professor and Chair, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Global Health, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Search for more papers by this author


Ashley Van Niekerk, Crime, Violence and Injury Lead Programme, Medical Research Council, PO Box 19070, Tygerberg 7505, South Africa. E-mail: ashley.vanniekerk@mrc.ac.za

Abstract

ABSTRACT Objective: Little attention has been paid to the prevention of pediatric scalding injuries in low-income settings, especially from the standpoint of local stakeholders. This study investigates stakeholder understandings of potential measures to prevent childhood scalding and the related hinders and enablers to such measures.

Design and Sample: The study utilized an exploratory qualitative design. Content analysis was applied to the transcriptions of interviews with 13 caregivers and 8 burn prevention research, policy, and practitioner professionals.

Measures: The study used semistructured interviews using illustrations to generate data. The 21 individual interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analytic steps. Interviews focused on 2 illustrations that depict circumstances that surround the occurrence of pediatric scalding typical for Cape Town.

Results: 3 categories of prevention measures were identified: enhancements to the safety of the home environment, changes to practice, and improvements to individual competence. The barriers identified were spatial constraints in homes, hazardous home facilities, and multiple family demands.

Conclusions: Caregivers and professionals report a similar range of measures to prevent pediatric scalding. Many of these might not be readily implementable in low-income settings with key barriers that would need to be addressed by policymakers and prevention practitioners.

Ancillary