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Populations at Risk Across the Lifespan: Case Studies: Factors Influencing Mothers' Abilities to Engage in a Comprehensive Parenting Intervention Program

Authors

  • Elaine Williams Domian,

    1. A.P.R.N., B.C., Ph.D., is Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Kansas School of Nursing, Kansas City, Kansas
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  • Kathleen M. Baggett,

    1. Ph.D., is Assistant Research Professor, Early Childhood Mental Health and Parenting Project Director, Juniper Gardens Children's Project, Schiefelbush Institute for Life-Span Studies, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas
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  • Judith J. Carta,

    1. Ph.D., is Senior Scientist and Professor, Juniper Gardens Children's Project, Schiefelbush Institute for Life-Span Studies, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas
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  • Stacia Mitchell,

    1. M.S., Ed.S. LPC, is Child and Family Intervention Specialist/Research Assistant, Juniper Gardens Children's Project, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas
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  • Edie Larson

    1. L.M.S.W., Child and Family Intervention Specialist/Research Assistant, Juniper Gardens Children's Project, University of Kansas, Kansas City Kansas.
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Elaine W. Domian, School of Nursing, University of Kansas, 3901 Rainbow Blve. Kansas City, KS. E-mail: edomian@kumc.edu

Abstract

ABSTRACT Objective This research identified the possible factors influencing the ability of mothers perceived to be at the highest risk for child maltreatment to engage in a home visitation program. This study holds significance to public health nursing since home visitation is an integral component of public health nursing practice, with engagement being essential for human interaction and thus nursing care to occur.

Design and Sample A qualitative descriptive design was used to offer a thematic summary of the experiences of program engagement from the perspective of 4 home visitation coach interventionists from health-related fields and a small sample of purposefully selected mothers involved in a longitudinal prevention study.

Results Qualitative content analysis revealed 3 major themes related to engagement: (1) mothers struggle to meet the emotional needs of the self and the child; (2) mothers lack support in navigating complicated and stressful life events; and (3) mothers' consistency with program engagement is mediated through a trusting and caring relationship with coaches.

Conclusions Home visitation coaches in this study demonstrated a continuous process of engagement by supporting mothers to explore and discover self-care strategies and ways to navigate life struggles. Over time, a foundation of trust and caring was developed, which in turn increased relationship building and program engagement.

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