The Decision to Receive Influenza Vaccination Among Nurses in North and South Dakota

Authors



Laurie Jo Johansen, College of Nursing, South Dakota State University, PO Box 2275, Wagner 349, Brookings, SD 57007. E-mail: laurie.johansen@sdstate.edu

Abstract

ABSTRACT Objectives: We examined the relationships between factors (intention, habit, facilitating conditions, and social, cognitive, and affective factors) and nurses' decisions about influenza vaccinations to understand why some get vaccinated while others do not.

Design and Sample: In a descriptive correlational design, the Triandis model of interpersonal behavior was used to examine the decision of nurses to receive influenza vaccinations. Participants were a random sample (N=193) of registered nurses in North and South Dakota drawn from the respective state nursing licensing board lists.

Measures: Instrument construction and mail survey procedures followed Dillman's tailored design method.

Results: The response rate exceeded 80%. The findings revealed significant, positive correlations among all model variables. Item analysis showed that false beliefs about influenza disease and vaccinations were prevalent and that there was a wide variation in employer support for nurses getting vaccinated.

Conclusions: Educational and social marketing strategies may improve nurse's knowledge about influenza disease and vaccine and increase vaccine uptake. Employers should be encouraged to promote and improve influenza vaccine accessibility in the workplace. Additional study is needed to understand how best to strengthen the influence of intention and habit on the decision of nurses to receive influenza vaccinations.

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