Melanoma Masquerading as Spitz Nevus Following Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Authors

  • Jeffry Goldes M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Fellow, Department of Dermatology and Dermatopathology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis
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  • Spencer Holmes M.D.,

    1. Staff Physician, Department of Dermatology, St Louis Park Medical Center, Minneapolis; Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Minnesota Medical School
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  • Mark Satz M.D.,

    1. Staff Physician, Department of Otolaryngology, St Louis Park Medical Center, Minnapolis; Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Minnesota Medical School
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  • John Cich M.D.,

    1. Staff Physician, Department of Pediatric Oncology, St Louis Park Medical Center, Minneapolis; Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Minnesota Medical School
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  • Louis Dehner M.D.

    1. Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis
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Jeffry Goldes, M.D. Department of Dermatology and Dermatopathology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis. MN 55455.

Abstract

Abstract: A malignant melanoma originally diagnosed as a Spitz nevus led to the death of a 10-year-old boy. The melanoma developed four years after therapy was begun for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Melanomas in children are rare. Melanomas histologically resembling Spitz ncvi have been reported. Deep contiguous growth and melanization are suspicious features. Lymphoproliferative malignancies are most commonly reported to occur in patients surviving treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Melanoma following acute lymphoblastic leukemia has not been described previously.

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