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Atopic Dermatitis in African American Children: Addressing Unmet Needs of a Common Disease

Authors

  • Vasanop Vachiramon M.D.,

    1. Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
    2. Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Hong Liang Tey MRCP (UK),

    1. Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
    2. National Skin Center, Singapore City, Singapore
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  • Amy E. Thompson M.D.,

    1. Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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  • Gil Yosipovitch M.D.

    1. Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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Address correspondence to Gil Yosipovitch, M.D., Department of Dermatology, Neurobiology and Anatomy, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, or e-mail: gyosipov@wakehealth.edu.

Abstract

Abstract  Recent published data suggest that the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) in African American children is significantly higher than in Caucasians. There are certain characteristics in the presentation of AD in African Americans that seem to differ from those in other racial groups, but there is a paucity of information on this topic. In this review, we highlight the differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of AD between African Americans and Caucasians. It is important for dermatologists to understand these differences in order to provide better care for African American children with AD.

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