Safety and Tolerability of a Body Wash and Moisturizer When Applied to Infants and Toddlers with a History of Atopic Dermatitis: Results from an Open-Label Study

Authors


  • Dr. Rizer has been a consultant for Johnson & Johnson.

  • This supplement was generously supported by Galderma.

Address correspondence to Ronald Gottschalk, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., Medical Affairs, Galderma Laboratories, L.P., 14501 North Freeway, Fort Worth, TX 76177, or e-mail: ron.gottschalk@galderma.com.

Abstract

Abstract:  Improving skin barrier function and moisturizing without irritation are important components of managing patients with atopic dermatitis. This study evaluated the safety and tolerability of a body wash and moisturizer regimen for infants and toddlers with atopic dermatitis. This was an open-label study involving 56 children (3–36 months old) with a history of atopic dermatitis. The skin care regimen (Cetaphil Restoraderm Skin Restoring Body Wash and Cetaphil Restoraderm Skin Restoring Moisturizer; Galderma Laboratories, L.P.) was used at least once daily, but no more than twice daily, for 4 weeks. The primary variable of interest was the worst postbaseline scores for local tolerability (expressed as success or failure) using a 4-point scale for each component (erythema, edema, scaling and dryness, rash, and signs of discomfort upon application). Assessments of moisture content of the stratum corneum and transepidermal water loss were also performed. Fifty-three children completed the study. The percentage of subjects with no erythema increased from 33.9% to 50.0% by Week 4. The percentage of subjects with no scaling or dryness increased from 58.9% to 85.2% at Week 4. A statistically significant increase in corneometry from baseline (p < 0.001) and a statistically significant decrease in transepidermal water loss (p = .009) were observed. The body wash and moisturizer regimen was safe and well tolerated and improved hydration and skin barrier function in infants and toddlers as young as 3 months of age with a history of atopic dermatitis.

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