Temperature Biofeedback Treatment for Migraine Headache: A Controlled Multiple Baseline Study

Authors

  • Dr. Robert L Drury Ph.D.,

    1. From the Mental Health Clinical Research Center for the Study of Schizophrenia, Camarillo-Neuropsychiatric Institute, UCLA Research Program, Camarillo, California.
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    • Dr. Drury is Assistant Clinical Professor Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine and

  • Dr. William J. DeRisi Ph.D.,

    1. From the Mental Health Clinical Research Center for the Study of Schizophrenia, Camarillo-Neuropsychiatric Institute, UCLA Research Program, Camarillo, California.
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    • Dr. Drury is Assistant Clinical Professor Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine and

  • Robert Paul Liberman M.D.

    1. From the Mental Health Clinical Research Center for the Study of Schizophrenia, Camarillo-Neuropsychiatric Institute, UCLA Research Program, Camarillo, California.
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  • Dr. DeRisi is Evaluation Specialist, California Department of Mental Health, Sacramento, CA.

  • This study was supported by NIMH Research Grant No. MH26207 (Behavior Analysis and Modification in a Community Mental Health Center) awarded by the Mental Health Services Research and Development Branch, Howard Davis, Ph.D., Chief.

Abstract

SYNOPSIS

A multiple baseline, within subject, controlled design was used to examine the effectiveness of a temperature biofeedback procedure augmented with autogenic and relaxation training, in the treatment of four patients who met the criteria for the migraine syndrome. Before treatment was begun, each patient recorded baseline data on hourly ratings of headache intensity and amount of analgesic medication used. The treatment package consisted of: (1) instructions aimed at generating favorable therapeutic expectations; (2) modified relaxation training; (3) use of autogenic phrases; and, (4) fingertip temperature feedback. In accord with the multiple baseline design, this package was introduced to individual patients sequentially in such a way that the effect of treatment was observed in headache and medication records of one patient before treatment was introduced to the next patient.

Results indicated that the treatment package had an impact on ratings of headache intensity and medication usage. The data showed idiosyncratic variations and individual differences among subjects in the response to treatment.

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