Platelet Monoamine Oxidase Activity in Female Migraine Patients

Authors

  • Aron D. Mosnaim Ph.D,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Biology, University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, Illinois 60064,
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  • Shankar Huprikar Ph.D,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Biology, University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, Illinois 60064,
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  • Marion E. Wolf M.D.,

    1. North Chicago Veterans Administration Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois,
    2. Loyola University Medical School Chicago, Illinois and
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  • Seymour Diamond M.D.

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Biology, University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, Illinois 60064,
    2. Diamond Headache Clinic, Chicago, Illinois.
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Abstract

SUMMARY

Platelet monoamine oxidase activity (MAO) in a group (n = 17) of white, female migraineurs during an acute migraine attack was similar to both the values obtained for the same group of patients two to three weeks after the headache episode (pain-free period) and to the results obtained for a group (n = 18) of sex and race-matched, age-comparable, drug-free healthy volunteers (blind study; substrate p-tyramine, 38.7 ± 5.7, 41.9 ± 8.8 and 43.0 ± 3.4 or p-methoxybenzylamine, 178.9 ± 11.3, 177.2 ± 6.9 and 181.0 ± 9.7 nmole/hr/10 9 platelets ± SD, respectively). With each patient serving as its own control, MAO activity during the migraine episode and when pain-free failed to show a significant trend. Neither a number of other medical conditions nor the use of several medications appeared to significantly influence our results. The present work, while dealing only with a small but well defined patient population, argues against the possible usefulness of platelet MAO activity as a biological marker for migraine headaches.

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