Intracranial Hypotension: Aggravation of Headache at High Altitude

Authors

  • John A. Batsis MBBCh,

  • Michael P. Phy DO


  • From the Department of Medicine, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education (Dr. Batsis); and Inpatient Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (Dr. Phy).

Address all correspondence to Dr. John A. Batsis, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905.

Abstract

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an increasingly recognized disorder, often, although not always, characterized by the triad of low-opening cerebrospinal fluid pressure on lumbar puncture, postural headache, and diffuse parenchymal meningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging of the head. We describe an unusual case of a patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension presenting with postural headache and tinnitus, aggravated at high altitudes.

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