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Gastric Stasis Occurs in Spontaneous, Visually Induced, and Interictal Migraine

Authors

  • Sheena Aurora MD,

    1. From the Swedish Neuroscience Institute – Swedish Headache Center, Seattle, WA (Dr. Aurora and Ms. Barrodale); Glaxo-SmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (Drs. Kori, Nelsen, and McDonald).
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  • Shashidhar Kori MD,

    1. From the Swedish Neuroscience Institute – Swedish Headache Center, Seattle, WA (Dr. Aurora and Ms. Barrodale); Glaxo-SmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (Drs. Kori, Nelsen, and McDonald).
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  • Patricia Barrodale RN,

    1. From the Swedish Neuroscience Institute – Swedish Headache Center, Seattle, WA (Dr. Aurora and Ms. Barrodale); Glaxo-SmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (Drs. Kori, Nelsen, and McDonald).
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  • Andrew Nelsen,

    1. From the Swedish Neuroscience Institute – Swedish Headache Center, Seattle, WA (Dr. Aurora and Ms. Barrodale); Glaxo-SmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (Drs. Kori, Nelsen, and McDonald).
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  • Susan McDonald MA

    1. From the Swedish Neuroscience Institute – Swedish Headache Center, Seattle, WA (Dr. Aurora and Ms. Barrodale); Glaxo-SmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (Drs. Kori, Nelsen, and McDonald).
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  • Conflict of Interest: Drs. Kori, Nelsen, and McDonald are employees of GlaxoSmithKline.

Dr. Sheena Aurora, Swedish Neuroscience Institute – Swedish Headache Center, 1101 Madison, Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98104.

Abstract

Objective.— To evaluate and compare gastric motility and emptying during spontaneous migraine to previous observations from induced migraine.

Blackground.— We have previously demonstrated a delay in gastric emptying both during the interictal period and during an induced migraine. A limitation noted in these studies was whether there are differences gastrointestinally during a visually induced migraine compared to spontaneous migraines. To address this, 9 additional studies have been performed to ascertain if there is a similar delay during spontaneous migraine

Methods.— Gastric scintigraphy using a standard meal was performed in 3 subjects during 3 periods: spontaneous migraine, induced migraine, and interictal period.

Results.— On average, the time to half emptying was delayed during spontaneous migraine (124 minutes), during induced migraine (182 minutes), and during the interictal period migraine (243 minutes) compared to normative values established at our center (112 minutes). On average, similar gastric slowing was seen in all 3 groups when the percentage of nuclear material remaining in the stomach at 2 hours was measured.

Conclusions.— This study provides additional evidence of gastric stasis in migraineurs interictally during induced and spontaneous migraine.

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