Percutaneous Balloon Compression for Trigeminal Neuralgias and Autonomic Cephalalgia

Authors

  • Constantine Constantoyannis MD, PhD,

    1. From the University of Patras – Neurosurgery, Rion, Greece (Dr. Constantoyannis); University of Patras – Medical Physics, Rion, Greece (Dr. Kagadis); University of Patras – Neurology, Rion, Greece (Dr. Chroni).
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  • George Kagadis BSc, MSc, PhD,

    1. From the University of Patras – Neurosurgery, Rion, Greece (Dr. Constantoyannis); University of Patras – Medical Physics, Rion, Greece (Dr. Kagadis); University of Patras – Neurology, Rion, Greece (Dr. Chroni).
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  • Elisabeth Chroni MD, PhD

    1. From the University of Patras – Neurosurgery, Rion, Greece (Dr. Constantoyannis); University of Patras – Medical Physics, Rion, Greece (Dr. Kagadis); University of Patras – Neurology, Rion, Greece (Dr. Chroni).
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  • Conflict of Interest: None

Dr. Constantine Constantoyannis, University of Patras – Neurosurgery, Rion, Greece.

Abstract

Objective.— This prospective study aimed to evaluate the results of percutaneous trigeminal ganglion balloon compression (BC) in patients with various types of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and autonomic cephalalgia.

Methods.— Twenty-five consecutive patients underwent BC and were followed up for 27-60 months. They were divided into 2 groups: group A (n = 18) patients with idiopathic TN and group B (n = 7) patients with secondary TN (n = 5) and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC) (n = 2).

Results.— Postoperatively, 15 patients in group A experienced pain relief, one required medication and 2 had no response; in group B, 6 were free of pain, including the 2 patients with TAC, and one required medication. Complications in both groups were either functionally trivial or infrequent. None of the patients developed keratitis or anesthesia dolorosa. Pain recurrence occurred early (<6 months) in one patient from group B, and late in 2 patients from group A.

Conclusion.— Balloon compression is a minimally invasive procedure that seems to be comparably successful for idiopathic and secondary TN, as well as TAC. However, further studies are deemed necessary to establish it as the first-line treatment in medically resistant trigeminal pain.

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