Rebound Abdominal Pain: Noncephalic Pain in Abdominal Migraine is Exacerbated by Medication Overuse

Authors

  • Lawrence C. Newman MD,

    1. From The Headache Institute, Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA (L. Newman); John Jay High School – Science Research, Cross River, NY, USA (E. Newman).
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  • Eric B. Newman

    1. From The Headache Institute, Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA (L. Newman); John Jay High School – Science Research, Cross River, NY, USA (E. Newman).
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  • Conflict of Interest: None

  • Clinical Notes

L. Newman, The Headache Institute, 1000 Tenth Ave., New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Abdominal migraine usually has its onset during childhood or adolescence and resolves in adulthood, often being replaced by typical migraine headaches. Rarely, migraine headache and recurrent abdominal pain coexist in some patients during adulthood. We report a patient who developed abdominal migraine without headaches beginning for the first time at the age of 22 years. The abdominal symptoms increased in frequency coincident with medication overuse and resolved after the overuse was treated. Analgesic overuse may cause a worsening of noncephalic pain in patients with extra-cephalic variants of migraine.

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