Clinical-Radiologic Heterogeneity of Occipital Neuralgiform Pain as Multiple Sclerosis Relapse

Authors

  • Lorenzo De Santi MD,

    1. From the Neurological and Behavioral Sciences, University of Siena (P. Annunziata and L. De Santi); Neuroradiology Unit, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, Siena, Italy (L. Monti, E. Menci, and M. Bellini).
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  • Lucia Monti MD,

    1. From the Neurological and Behavioral Sciences, University of Siena (P. Annunziata and L. De Santi); Neuroradiology Unit, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, Siena, Italy (L. Monti, E. Menci, and M. Bellini).
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  • Elisabetta Menci MD,

    1. From the Neurological and Behavioral Sciences, University of Siena (P. Annunziata and L. De Santi); Neuroradiology Unit, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, Siena, Italy (L. Monti, E. Menci, and M. Bellini).
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  • Matteo Bellini MD,

    1. From the Neurological and Behavioral Sciences, University of Siena (P. Annunziata and L. De Santi); Neuroradiology Unit, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, Siena, Italy (L. Monti, E. Menci, and M. Bellini).
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  • Pasquale Annunziata MD

    1. From the Neurological and Behavioral Sciences, University of Siena (P. Annunziata and L. De Santi); Neuroradiology Unit, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, Siena, Italy (L. Monti, E. Menci, and M. Bellini).
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  • Conflict of Interest: None

P. Annunziata, Neurological and Behavioral Sciences, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Abstract

Occipital neuralgia may be related to traumatic, compressive, or inflammatory injury to the occipital nerve or C2 radicular level and cervical spinal cord lesions. We report a series of 3 patients with definite relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) who experienced sudden occipital neuralgiform pain with or without diminished sensation in the cervical region and associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of a new active or new T2-weighted demyelinating C2 cervical lesion. We suggest that sudden paroxysmal occipital pain may signal relapse of MS and cervical MRI with gadolinium should be considered; these patients show good clinical response to high-dose intravenous corticosteroids.

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