Prochlorperazine—Treatment for Acute Confusional Migraine

Authors

  • Rakesh Khatri MD,

    1. From the University of Cincinnati—Department of Neurology (R. Khatri); Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center—Department of Neurology, Cincinnati, OH, USA (A.D. Hershey and B. Wong).
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  • Andrew D. Hershey MD, PhD,

    1. From the University of Cincinnati—Department of Neurology (R. Khatri); Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center—Department of Neurology, Cincinnati, OH, USA (A.D. Hershey and B. Wong).
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  • Brenda Wong MBBS, MRCP

    1. From the University of Cincinnati—Department of Neurology (R. Khatri); Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center—Department of Neurology, Cincinnati, OH, USA (A.D. Hershey and B. Wong).
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  • Conflict of Interest: None

B. Wong, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Department of Neurology, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA.

Abstract

Acute confusional migraine is a rare migraine variant primarily seen in childhood that lacks standardized diagnostic criteria. Acute symptomatic treatment for this disorder has not been established. We report 2 patients having a total of 6 episodes of acute confusional migraine where the symptoms resolved with prochlorperazine with variable success. Intravenous prochlorperazine was highly effective in 3 out of 4 episodes.

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