Pain Remapping in Migraine: A Novel Characteristic Following Trigeminal Nerve Injury

Authors

  • Aamir Hussain MD,

    1. From the Jefferson Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA (A. Hussain and M.L. Oshinsky); Jefferson Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA (M.A. Stiles).
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  • Marlind A. Stiles DMD,

    1. From the Jefferson Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA (A. Hussain and M.L. Oshinsky); Jefferson Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA (M.A. Stiles).
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  • Michael L. Oshinsky PhD

    1. From the Jefferson Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA (A. Hussain and M.L. Oshinsky); Jefferson Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA (M.A. Stiles).
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  • Conflict of Interest: None

M.A. Stiles, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 909 Walnut Street, Third Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

Abstract

(Headache 2010;50:669-674)

The location of pain during the headache phase of migraine varies between individuals as well as between attacks in some individuals. We have observed a “remapping” or a change in the location of migraine pain following injury to the trigeminal system that is a novel characteristic to migraine and has not been described in other trigeminal pain syndromes of the head, neck, and face. Recognition of this clinical feature implies that the pathophysiology of migraine is impressionable and may be why diagnosis and treatment are often delayed.

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