Migraine and Vertigo: A Marriage of Convenience?

Authors

  • John Phillips FCRS(ORL-HNS),

    1. From Neurotology Unit, Division of Otolaryngology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (J. Phillips, N. Longridge, and A. Mallinson); Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (G. Robinson).
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  • Neil Longridge MD, FRCSC(Otolaryngology),

    1. From Neurotology Unit, Division of Otolaryngology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (J. Phillips, N. Longridge, and A. Mallinson); Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (G. Robinson).
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  • Arthur Mallinson MSc,

    1. From Neurotology Unit, Division of Otolaryngology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (J. Phillips, N. Longridge, and A. Mallinson); Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (G. Robinson).
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  • Gordon Robinson MD, FRCP(Neurology)

    1. From Neurotology Unit, Division of Otolaryngology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (J. Phillips, N. Longridge, and A. Mallinson); Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (G. Robinson).
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  • Conflict of Interest: Dr. John Phillips, Dr. Neil Longridge, and Mr. Arthur Mallinson have no actual or potential conflicts of interest to declare. This article is not a study, so was therefore unfunded. Dr. Gordon Robinson wishes to declare the following potential conflicts of interest: (1) National migraine advisory board member – Allergan, Teva Neuroscience, Johnson & Johnson, and Pfizer; (2) Supported presenter – Merck, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, and Teva Neuroscience; (3) No stock holdings in pharma.

J. Phillips, 11140 Granville Avenue, Richmond, BC, Canada, V6Y 1R6.

Abstract

“Migraine associated vertigo” is emerging as a popular diagnosis for patients with recurrent vertigo. However, in view of our current understanding of both migraine and vertigo, “migraine associated vertigo,” in contrast to basilar artery migraine, is neither clinically nor biologically plausible as a migraine variant.

(Headache 2010;50:1362-1365)

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