Potential Risk Factors for Psychiatric Disorders in Patients With Headache

Authors

  • Chaichana Nimnuan MD, PhD,

    1. From Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (C. Nimnuan); Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (T. Asawavichienjinda); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (A. Srikiatkhachorn).
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  • Thanin Asawavichienjinda MD, PhD,

    1. From Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (C. Nimnuan); Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (T. Asawavichienjinda); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (A. Srikiatkhachorn).
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  • Anan Srikiatkhachorn MD

    Corresponding author
    1. From Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (C. Nimnuan); Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (T. Asawavichienjinda); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (A. Srikiatkhachorn).
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  • Conflict of Interest: None.

A. Srikiatkhachorn, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand, email: anan.s@chula.ac.th

Abstract

Background.— Psychiatric comorbidities are common among patients with headache. These can compromise the quality of life of patients and may affect the result of treatment. No available systematic study concerning this problem has been conducted in Thailand.

Objective.— The study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of psychiatric disorders in patients with headache in tertiary care facility.

Methods.— The study was conducted at the Headache Clinic, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. One hundred and thirteen patients were enrolled. Diagnosis of headache was made based on International Classification of Headache Disorders II system. Mental disorders were assessed using Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Other possible risk factors were extracted using significant physical symptoms count and accumulated risk for mental disorder.

Results.— Of the 113 samples analyzed, the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and somatoform disorder was found to be 29.2%, 9.7%, and 27.4%, respectively. No definite relationship between headache types and mental disorders was observed. High number of significant physical complaints and health concerns significantly increased the risk for depression (OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.6 to 13.5) while the level of possible risk for mental disorder was associated with an increased risk for somatoform disorder (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2 to 2.2).

Conclusion.— The study confirmed high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in patients with headache. The results of this study will raise the awareness of physicians to possible underlying mental disorders in patients with headache and facilitate appropriate treatment or psychiatric referral.

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