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Keywords:

  • Fibromyalgia;
  • Osteoarthritis;
  • Pain;
  • Central Nervous System;
  • Trauma;
  • Stress

Abstract

Objective.  To identify correlates of perceived pain-related restrictions in a community sample of women with fibromyalgia.

Method.  The fibromyalgia group was composed of white women with a self-reported, physician-given fibromyalgia diagnosis (N = 238) from the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (BRHS). BRHS respondents had participated in the larger Adventist Health Study-2. To identify associations with pain-related restrictions, we used hierarchical linear regression. The outcome measure was subjects' pain-related restrictions (one SF-12 version 2 item). Predictors included age, education, body mass index (BMI), sleep apnea, and fibromyalgia treatment in the last year, as well as standardized measures for trauma, major life stress, depression, and hostility. To better interpret the findings, pain-related restrictions also were predicted in women with osteoarthritis and no fibromyalgia.

Results.  Women with fibromyalgia reporting the more severe pain-related restrictions were those who had experienced trauma accompanied by physical pain, were older, less educated, more depressed, more hostile, had high BMI scores, and had been treated for fibromyalgia in the last 12 months (adjusted R2 = 0.308). Predictors in women with osteoarthritis were age, BMI, treatment in the last 12 months, experience of a major life stressor, and greater depression symptom severity (adjusted R2 = 0.192).

Conclusions.  In both groups, age, BMI, treatment in the last 12 months, and depression predicted pain-related restrictions. Experience of a traumatic event with physical pain was the strongest predictor in the fibromyalgia group. These findings may be useful in constructing novel treatments and prevention strategies for pain-related morbidity in fibromyalgia patients.